How To: Make Honey Roasted Pumpkin Soup – a photo guide

Follow this 'dead easy' recipe to fill hollow Halloween tummies
Follow this 'dead easy' recipe and fill up your hollow Halloween tummies! Would you like to lift this photo shoot to put on your website? No problem! Just drop me a line

If you’re planning on carving out a pumpkin to celebrate Halloween, here’s a great way of turning the leftover scoopings into something utterly delicious to warm you up when you get home.

It’s best served hot, with chunks of tasty bread for dipping and mopping.

Pumpkins will be around for a few weeks more and they’ll be super cheap once Halloween is over and done with, so you might be able to bag yourself a bargain at the greengrocers too.

This is also a fun recipe to cook up with a friend, so why not take Jamie Oliver’s great advice and share the fun by passing it on!

 

 

 

Ingredients –

Pumpkin flesh. Weigh it and you want half the weight of onions and a little garlic,

ie 2lbs pumpkin to 1lb onions.

A splash of water to clean your pans.

A mug full of vegetable stock

or

A mug of cream.

Seasoning.

 

Start by taking the lid off of your pumpkin and don't forget to allow enough room for you to get your hand in to scrape it out!  Remove all the seeds from the centre and reserve them, dry them out and plant one or two for next year. Using a short knife, parr all the flesh out and put it into a roasting tin.
Start by taking the lid off of your pumpkin and don't forget to make it big enough to get your hand in! Scoop out all the seeds in the centre, dry them out and plant a few next year! Put the other centre scoopings into your compost heap. Now parr out all the flesh and put it into a roasting tin. Drizzle with a little honey, olive oil and seasoning, toss well and put on the middle or bottom shelf of a moderate oven.
Roughly chop your onions (I used whites for this recipe, but you can sling in a few reds to add to the colour).  Put them in a roasting tin, drizzle with honey, a little olive oil and seasoning, toss to cover them and roast on the top shelf of a moderate oven.
Roughly chop your onions (I used whites for this recipe, but you can sling in a few reds to add to the colour) and add a few chopped cloves of garlic if you feel so inclined. Put them in a roasting tin, drizzle with honey, a little olive oil and seasoning, toss to cover them and roast on the top shelf of a moderate oven.
Drizzle the scooped out pumpkin in honey and a little olive oil, season with salt and pepper and roast in the middle or bottom shelf of a moderate oven for about an hour.
Here's the pumpkin progress. Give it all a good stir after 30 minutes and return the tin to the oven and reduce the heat slightly.
Give your onions a good stir at the same time.  You may find some of the exposed honeyed tops have caramelised and look a little burned, they are delicious, stir them all into the tin and ensure everything is wet before returning to the oven for the last 1/2 hour.
Give your onions a good stir at the same time. You may find some of the exposed honeyed tops have caramelised and look a little burned, they are delicious, stir them all into the tin and ensure everything is wet before returning to the oven for the last 1/2 hour.
Once everything looks deliciously golden, it's time to poke it all in the blender.  The onions will have a little liquid in the bottom of the pan, but the pumpkin pan will be much jucier.  Make sure you get every drop in the blender and scrap out all the golden bits too.
Once everything looks deliciously golden, it's ready to put into the blender. The onion will have a little liquid in the bottom of the pan and the pumpkin should have quite a bit. Pour it all into the blender and blast it!
Clean your roasting pans out with a little water and leave them to soak off all the burned on golden bits!  Give that a whizz in the blender too and put it all into a large lidded pan.
Clean your roasting pans out with a little water and leave them to soak off all the burned on golden bits! Give that a whizz in the blender too and put it all into a large lidded pan.
It'll be a thick old dollop of soup at this stage, nice and velvety in texture with a gorgeous golden colour from the pumpkin.  Pour it into a large pot and see what consistency it has before you start adding any other liquids to thin it down.  This should be a thick, heartwarming soup, not a runny job!
If you've done a couple of large trays like I have, you'll need to make a few trips to the blender. The soup should have a thick and velvety consistency now. Pour everything into a large pot and give it all a good stir before you add any further liquids to thin it down.
You're just about done.  Heat the soup through and taste those delicious combinations of winter veg!  If you want a thinner soup, either add a tea cup of good vegetable stock, or if you fancy being naughty, make it a small pot of cream instead just before you serve it.  Stir well throughout the soup and make final adjustments of seasoning if need be.
You're just about done. Heat the soup through and taste those delicious combinations of winter veg! If you want a thinner soup, either add a tea cup of good vegetable stock, or if you fancy being naughty, make it a small pot of cream instead just before you serve it. Stir well throughout the soup and make final adjustments of seasoning if need be.

If you’d like me to do a step-by-step photo guide for another simple and delicious recipe, drop me a note in the comments box and I’ll happily oblige!

If you’d like to reprint this colourful photo shoot recipe on your website, no problem! Just drop me a line to tell me where it’s going and credit it back with a link to this blog.

Rubbishly yours,

TSx